Just Transition to Clean Energy: A Virtual Conference

Seventh Generation’s 2020 Conference will look a little different than years past. 

Rather than a member meeting of networking, a panel of speakers on stage, and members, colleagues, educators, investors, advisors, and friends, we’re preparing for a virtual panel discussion, donning the style of a “Brady Bunch” title screen we all have been experiencing these past few months. 

The year, 2020, marks 50 years since the first Earth Day, and we are grappling with the effects of the climate crisis. At present, and in years past, SGI members urge utilities, among other companies, to publish decarbonization plans that meet Science-Based Targets (SBT) aiming to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees celsius. Without corporate action, this is seemingly impossible. Moving towards a low-carbon economy presents new challenges on technology and the workforce.  

This year’s annual conference: Just Transition to Clean Energy will take place virtually on October 12th, 2020. 

Joining us to take on the questions of “what is a Just Transition?,” and “what does it mean for energy providers, employees, consumers, and investors?,” are:

These expert panelists will bring a unique set of experiences and remarks, challenging each other, and us, on the path to achieving a Just Transition. A social issue as much as a technology, climate’s intersection with human work becomes more apparent in the energy sector as the push towards electrification grows. We are lucky to have this great panel lined up for this event, and we look forward to learning all we can from them! 

It would be hard to hold this conference and not mention the impacts of COVID-19 on all those affected. While we hope our virtual conference allows for the inclusion of those previously unable to attend, we hope all are staying safe and healthy amid this pandemic.

If you are interested in attending, and haven’t previously registered, please do so here.

The webinar link and information will be sent out via Eventbrite prior to the conference date. 

Earth Day

While the term “climate change” had not been invoked by April 22, 1970, awareness of human involvement changing Earth induced a fear mixed with hope. Scientists could not see the future of our planet, and newspaper headlines at the time captured concern for the environment and for peace as protests surrounding the Vietnam War were met with groups putting cars on trial

And as most of the United States currently sits in the unknown because of the COVID-19, the Earth keeps turning. 

But with EPA rollbacks during a global pandemic, the US withdrawing from the ever-important Paris Agreement, and the impacts of the BP oil spill still being felt ten years later, it can be difficult to find those positives. But they do exist.

Many improvements have been made since that first Earth Day, now 50 years ago. The current National Geographic depicts how life expectancy has increased along with food production, more people have access to clean water and electricity, and pollution levels (overall) have fallen. Even during this crisis, we see renewable energy, like solar and wind, growing in capacity.

Coupled with this uncertainty of the environment, for me comes a feeling of nostalgia: remembering the saplings handed out to us in elementary school, thinking about the recycling program my grandmother started in her town, visualizing the passion Denis Hayes had in organizing the first Earth Day. These individual acts, small notions, and world movements all exude a hope of possibility of positive change. From a young age, environmental activists like Severn Suzuki, Greta Thurnberrg, and Delaney Reynolds witness to a heartfelt passion as vibrant as Hayes’. Students are urging their universities to divest from fossil fuels. Community gardens push back against the concrete that dominates our cities.  

On the first Earth Day, 50 years ago, New York City’s Mayor Lindsay put it simply; “Beyond words like ecology, environment, and pollution there is a simple question: Do we want to live or die?”