Update: NYT reports on investors’ letter to Disney

In February, we posted news of SGI and its members joining other investors in a letter to Disney to restrict smoking in products from newly acquired Fox film and television assets. Yesterday, The New York Times carried news of our letter in an article entitled “There’s No Smoking in Disney Films. What About When It Owns Fox?

More about the engagement with Disney on tobacco can be found here:

SGI members join investor letter to Walt Disney regarding tobacco depictions in films

When CEO Bob Iger said, during a Q&A session at Disney’s 2015 annual shareholder meeting, the company will “absolutely prohibit” the use of smoking in Disney films rated PG-13 and under, faith-based investors lauded the decision. It built on a prior commitment from 2007 that prohibited smoking in Disney films, but not yet across their brands.

The 2015 commitment was not a decision limited to certain labels: “We are extending our policy to prohibit smoking in movies across the board: Marvel, Lucas, Pixar, and Disney films,” said Iger. Iger offered only two exceptions: films which involve historical figures known for smoking, or scenes that portray smoking in a negative light (emphasizing the detrimental health consequences of smoking). Disney’s full policy can be found here.

In December of 2017, Disney acquired Fox film and television for $52 billion. It remains unclear what Disney will do with the new acquisitions.

SGI and its members joined other investors in a letter to Disney that calls upon the company to apply the same standards to the film and television properties acquired from Fox that it applies to other film and television holdings already within its portfolio.

Again, read the full investor letter here.

Access to Medicine Index: Critical tool for investors

Pharmaceutical companies have been receiving some bad press in the United States for unprecedented price increases of life savings drugs. Given the difficulty for people in this country to afford these medicines, imagine how much more difficult it must be for citizens of nations where even basic medicines are a challenge to obtain. An important tool

The Access to Medicine Foundation, an international nonprofit organization based in the Netherlands, is dedicated to improving access to medicine for people in need. Their award-winning initiative called the Access to Medicine Index (ATMI), launched in 2008 ranks the world’s 20 largest research-based pharmaceutical companies according to their efforts to improve access to medicine in low- to middle-income countries. The 2016 edition of the ATMI can be found here.

2016 ATMI rankings

The ATMI assesses how companies perform in the following areas: management of access to their medicine; market influence and compliance; research and development; pricing, manufacturing and distribution; patents and licensing; capacity building; and product donation. By comparing companies to one another, the ATMI aims to stimulate pharmaceutical companies to play a bigger role in addressing the challenges of access to medicine in developing countries and to offer them insight into the activities of their peers. As well, the ATMI seeks to create a platform for stakeholders from the pharmaceutical industry, governments, investors, civil society, patient organizations and academia to gather and form a common view of how these pharmaceutical companies can make further progress.

For us at SGI, the ATMI, and the work behind it, is incredibly valuable. I was a part of a recent conversation with staff from the Access to Medicine Foundation and can only salute the foundation’s transparency, its openness to input from stakeholders, its solid research, and its contribution to making the pharmaceutical industry better serve the poor. As credible third party research, the ATMI helps us work toward important goals in our dialogues with pharmaceutical companies.

SGI is deeply committed to its work in health. The late Fr. Mike Crosby, O.F.M., Cap. was a pioneer in engagement with tobacco companies. Today, Marty Roers continues the work in tobacco for the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondolet.  Sr. Judy Sinnwell, O.S.F. (Sisters of St. Francis of Dubuque) engages several pharmaceutical companies on the affordability of medicine. Ann Roberts at Dana Investment Advisors, Inc. and Fr. Robert Wotypka, O.F.M., Cap. (of the Capuchin Franciscan Province of St. Joseph) are also engaged with companies on drug pricing.

To learn more about the ATMI: