On opioids, shareholders spoke, companies begin to listen

Since 2017, SGI has participated in Investors for Opioid Accountability (IOA). This week, the IOA released a two-year progress report detailing landmark agreements with 20 opioid manufacturers, distributors and retail pharmacies implicated in the crisis. 

Between headlines about Democratic debates and Washington feuds, news about lawsuits and proposed settlements have drawn some attention this week. Steadily and purposefully, the IOA has dug down into the crisis and sought ways to address it as shareholders. Specifically, the IOA has engaged opioid manufacturers, distributors, retail pharmacies, and manufacturers of drug treatments.

A few important things to note from the report:

  • A majority (52%) of shareholder proposals led to agreements with the companies;
  • Of the shareholder resolutions filed, seven resolutions at Rite Aid, Walgreens, Mallinckrodt, Mylan, and Assertio Therapeutics received majority votes and an additional two resolutions received majority support at AmerisourceBergen from independent voters, leading to reforms;
  • Twelve companies agreed to conduct risk assessments of opioid-related business practices including governance, compliance, compensation and political lobbying and to report these findings publicly. Two of these companies (Cardinal Health and Assertio) established special board-level committees on opioids;
  • Ten companies agreed to adopt misconduct clawback policies  to recoup executive pay, including the public disclosure of the use of the clawback;
  • Three companies agreed to separate their chair and CEO positions (McKesson, Cardinal Health and AmerisourceBergen), and;
  • Two companies agreed to disclose when they adjusted metrics to exclude legal costs when calculating their executive pay awards. 

Established out of heightened concern that opioid company risks both threaten long-term shareholder value and have profound long-term implications for our economy and society, the IOA uniquely represents influential and diverse funds from across the investing universe including faith-based, sustainability, public, and labor funds as well as comptrollers, treasurers and asset managers that are taking swift and decisive actions to hold manufacturers, distributors, and retail pharmacies’ boards accountable for their role in the opioid crisis. The IOA consists of 54 investors with over $4 trillion in assets under management and is co-led by Mercy Investment Services, Inc. and the UAW Retiree Medical Benefits Trust.

If you wonder what difference shareholders can make, this report spells out in particular detail how attentive and deliberate engagement can achieve results. We are proud of our participation in the IOA. We’d urge our members to examine this report. As you do, keep in heart and mind those who have died in this opioid epidemic, those who struggle with addiction today, families devastated by losses, and communities overwhelmed with the human and material cost of this crisis. If you hold shares in companies outlined in the report, we’d welcome the opportunity to facilitate your support of these engagements. Please, contact our staff for more information.

Additional posts concerning the opioid epidemic and SGI’s efforts are found here:

SGI 2019 Conference Will Make An Impact!

As fall begins to make an appearance, we start looking to the weeks and months ahead. While not everyone likes to leave the summer behind, fall brings the excitement of cool air, crisp leaves, spices wafting through the air, and the annual SGI conference, this year on Impact Investing: Social Return on Investment on October 7th.  This transition from summer into fall is the perfect time to evaluate the different impacts our institutions and we personally have on relationships, community, and society. How do we nurture what needs caring for? How do we help ourselves and others continue to grow and thrive? And, can our financial investments reap the same benefits while including this sense of intentionality?

We’re excited about the opportunity to listen to our keynote speaker, Seamus Finn, Missionary Oblate’s Director of Justice, Peace & Integrity of Creation and ICCR Board Chair, and our expert panelists, who I’m sure will bring their opinion on the change of seasons, but more importantly will share their unique experiences and stories on impact investing.

The Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN) defines Impact Investing as “investments made with the intention to generate positive, measurable social and environmental impact alongside a financial return.” Imagine a world where our investments have an impact outside of solely generating a profit, creating positive change. Amit Bouri of GIIN, in an article geared toward faith based investors, explains:

Simply put, impact investing is investing to achieve both a financial return and positive, measurable social or environmental impact. It differs both from traditional philanthropy, which aims for impact but is unconcerned with financial returns, and from other forms of values-driven investment which aim at the avoidance of harm, but not necessarily the creation of additional, measurable positive benefits.

GIIN’s 2019 survey found that the impact investing industry is diverse, including many types of institutions investing in all asset classes. It continues to grow and mature with over $500 billion invested assets. Over 90% of impact investors report that returns meet or exceed their expectations. GIIN’s Impact Investing Guide provides an excellent background for our members.

We’re lucky to be welcoming George Hinton, Greg Lane, Salli Martyniak, and Ken Vander Weele to the panel, alongside moderator, Sr. Dorothy Pagosa to help us explore this topic. Our speakers and panelists will walk us through the purpose and focus of impact investing and all that it can hold. We’ll learn about their mission, motivations, takeaways, and advice in the growing market.

Born and raised in Milwaukee, George Hinton, CEO of the Social Development Commission (SDC) coordinates programs for Milwaukee County’s low-income residents. The SDC’s mission is to “empower people with the resources to move beyond poverty,” which they have been doing since 1963. Greg Lane, CFO of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart, helps the sisters utilize their resources for the benefit of the common good. He has helped developed a mission-aligned impact investment portfolio and repurpose real estate according to need. Salli Martyniak, president of Forward Community Investments support “organizations, initiatives, and coalitions throughout Wisconsin.” They make it a priority to offer their loans and grants at an affordable cost to assist both the small and mid-sized projects and organizations. Co-founder and partner in Creation Investments Capital Management, Ken Vander Weele, will show us the global side of impact investing. Ken has worked in India, South-east Asia, Eastern Europe, and the United States investing in emerging market financial services companies that serve poor clients. His local and global work will show us the social return of impact investing around the planet. Finally, Sr. Dorothy Pagosa, Director for Social Justice for the Sisters of St. Joseph – Third Order of St. Francis and a member of SGI, will moderate the panel. Sr. Dorothy has first hand experience in identifying and managing impact investments in the midwest.

The event will be preceded by a member meeting and followed by a reception. We hope all of our members and friends will attend what is shaping up to be a very exciting conference.

Corporate Governance Webinar

At the heart of this webinar is the conviction, born of evidence, that transparent and accountable corporate practices correlates to higher shareholder value and lower volatility in share prices. A company run well will deliver superior financial returns, over the long term, than a company that does not adhere to principles of transparency and accountability,

On Thursday, August 29, we were joined in our quarterly webinar by two leaders within the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility (ICCR): Tim Smith of Walden Asset Management and John Keenan of  American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME).

We are very grateful for the presence of both our guests in this webinar, for their commitment to work on these issues, and their generosity in sharing their wisdom with us.

As always, we welcome your feedback via a confidential evaluation found here. Slides from the webinar are found here.

Corporate America Develops a Conscience?

By Frank Sherman

There has been a lot of media coverage this week of the Business Roundtable CEOs new commitment and statement on the purpose of corporations. Leaders of companies including JPMorgan Chase, Apple, Amazon and Walmart have abandon their 40+ year sole focus on shareholders to embrace a “fundamental commitment” to all their stakeholders: putting employees, suppliers and communities on a pedestal that once belonged only to shareholders.

Anand Giridharadas, author of Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World, has been an effective critic of the statement.  “I absolutely see the change. It has become socially unacceptable as a company or a rich person not to be doing good. But what many are failing to do is ask: ‘What have I done that may be drowning out any of the do-gooding I’m doing?’ ” (Fortune, Aug 19, 2019). He cites the 2017 tax bill, supported by the Business Roundtable, in which the lion’s share of the benefits ended up in the hands of the top 1%, increasing the income inequality underlying many social problems.

The ‘enlightened’ CEOs are also taking heat from the right. The Wall Street Journal editorial page was quick to criticize (WSJ, Aug 19, 2019)… “A close reading shows there’s less substance here than meets the media spin, but it’s still notable that the CEOs for America’s biggest companies feel the need to distance themselves from their owners. Yet these CEOs are fooling themselves if they think this new rhetoric will buy off Ms. Warren and the socialist left. It may even embolden them by implying that corporate rules that require a focus on achieving value for shareholders are somehow morally insufficient.”

But Steven Pearlstein, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The Washington Post, professor of public affairs at George Mason University, and author of the book Can American Capitalism Survive? has a different take from the BRT statement. His article in the American Prospect five years ago (When Shareholder Capitalism Came to Town, Apr 19, 2014) partly blamed the BRT for corporate America’s sole focus on shareholder value leading to the corruption of capitalism. However, Pealstein was optimistic about the BRT statement. “It’s important because it signals a shift in attitude in norms. That’s already occurring. It’s sort of confirming something that’s happening that’s, I think, the pendulum swinging back in the right direction, after having swung too far in favor of shareholders.” Pealstein met J.P. Morgan Chase’s CEO and chair of the BRT, Jamie Dimon, in his office last year to discuss the growing public distrust of corporations and CEOs.

When asked by PBS host John Yang if this may just be a P.R. gimmick, Pearlstein gave some practical advice that all stakeholders can benefit.  “Yes, it is good for P.R., but if they don’t follow through, if we continue to see companies that say, I’m giving up my American citizenship so that we don’t have to pay U.S. taxes anymore because our shareholders are making us do it; if companies say, we’re going to crush our unions because our shareholders are making us do it; they won’t be able to get away with that anymore.”

It’s up to us to remind these CEOs of their new found conscience!

MCRI merges with SGI Coalition for Responsible Investing

By Barbara Jennings, CSJ

After two years of discussion about the best path forward, the St. Louis-based Midwest Coalition for Responsible Investment (MCRI) merged with Milwaukee-based Seventh Generation Interfaith (SGI) coalition to make both organizations stronger. 

MCRI began in 1977 focusing on the issue of the day:  South African apartheid. Michael Crosby, OFM Cap, the founder of SGI, visited St. Louis to explain the process of shareholder engagement and encouraged the formation of a regional socially responsible investment coalition.  Several Catholic institutions in the area decided to form MCRI. Other connections between St. Louis and Milwaukee:  beer towns, Midwest agriculture, defense industry, and racial disparity. 

MCRI joined the Interfaith Center for Corporate Responsibility shortly after it was formed. This connected us to many Catholic religious’ women and men congregations, as well as to representatives of other faith traditions.  We expanded our tactics beyond the traditional “negative screens” (e.g. no weapons, tobacco, gambling, birth control) to include corporate engagements, proxy voting and shareholder meeting attendance.

MCRI’s first resolution in 1978 asked McDonnell Douglas to build up its commercial business over military contracts which were dependent on foreign policy and regional conflicts. The proposal was presented by Sr. Mary Ann McGivern, SL. From that auspicious beginning, the work of MCRI expanded. By 1980, MCRI had thirteen institutional members. That same year, the coalition sponsored a local conference entitled “Corporate Responsibility: Why the Churches Must Be Involved.”  It was well attended by both treasurers and social justice representatives.       

Under the leadership of Susan Jordan, SSND, MCRI’s issues expanded to include nuclear waste (Union Electric, now Ameren), foreign military sales (General Dynamics, McDonnell Douglas/Boeing), and agricultural pesticides and GMO’s (Monsanto, now Bayer).  Other issues on which we engaged companies on were infant formula in Central America, AIDS medication from the pharmaceutical industry, and labor slavery in various supply chains.   

By 2007, Barbara Jennings, CSJ, who had been on MCRI’s Advisory Committee in the 1990’s, became the Executive Director of MCRI.  The issues at ICCR had grown tremendously, almost too much so that the saying at ICCR meetings was “We never met an issue we didn’t like.”  In 2015, ICCR adopted a human rights lens to all its’ work. Priority issues included climate change, human trafficking / labor rights, water stewardship and food justice.

MCRI continued to work with Ameren concerning their disposal of coal ash. A 2018 resolution received 53% vote, a rare majority for a shareholder resolution!  The coalition worked with Monsanto for several years on water issues. The company now uses low drip and recycling of water in their labs after a 2010 successful withdrawal of a resolution. After many years of engagement with Boeing, the company hired a third party auditor to delve into their supply chain for labor infringements.     

So, the work will go on….and with a more supportive business atmosphere than in 1977.   What has changed?   A greater awareness of the risks posed by climate change? Recognition of the liability posed by pollution?  Understanding that companies can outsource manufacturing but not the responsibility associated with it? The internet and social media together with increased societal expectations has placed more responsibility on corporations to account for their environmental and social impacts.

Each of the nine MCRI members (SSND, GSPMNA, CSJ, CPPS, OSU, SJ, SM, CSJ Congregational Center, and JAG Capital Management) will continue in corporate engagements as part of SGI’s coalition. I ask that you please stay active to bring the faith-based investor voice to corporate board rooms.

As for me, I have joined the SGI Board of Directors and will continue to remain active in this work. I was proud to be part of this journey and thank you for your support. 

The long and winding road

by Pat Zerega

Senior Director Shareholder Advocacy, Mercy Investment Services

This weekend, we saw Rocketman, the story of Elton John. It brought back memories of so many songs we grew up with.  For some reason I kept thinking of the song the long and winding road as a parallel to the story (even though it was written by the Beatles, Elton John performed it on occasion). Part of the reason it came to mind is that the song reflects how I feel about the private prison work and GEO specifically. It might be helpful to review some of the history that got us to today.

Around 2003, John Celichowski, O.F.M., Cap. and Valerie Heinonen, O.S.U., began approaching the private prison companies. At that point, their stock was considered ‘penny stock’ with few members at ICCR owning GEO, CCA or Cornell. The first resolution oat GEO received 3.2% and a similar resolution brought CCA to the table without going to vote. Fr. John moved on to leadership in the community and passed the mantle to Fr. Mike Crosby.  A variety of approaches including lobbying and human rights policy development continued with GEO and CoreCivic (formerly Corrections Corporation of America) through 2011. Dialogues were often contentious (my participation was through the Lutherans), and at one point the CEO of GEO wondered why we didn’t just “sell the stock and leave them alone.” We continued to focus concern with the people in custody.

In 2011, a resolution calling for a human rights policy was filed. At the same time, the Jesuit Social Research Center had obtained a grant to work with private prisons around human rights and training, so the Jesuits began to lead both dialogues. This grant brought in prison experts to help lead the way and both companies developed polices and entered into dialogue.  

We all know writing a policy is not the be all and end all of work. We need to see that the policy doesn’t sit on the shelf but is implemented, training occurring and the culture changing. Shareholders expected to be able to find that out through dialogue and increased transparency in reporting on the prison companies’ websites.

Since that time, the dialogues have focused on several issues including medical care and segregation from the general population, but shareholders felt like we were not seeing the real impact hoped for with a human rights policy. Abuse allegations remained high, and news coverage of these events continued. In the spring of 2018, we began to see many reports concerning immigration detention conditions in private prisons. ICCR hosted letters to both private prison companies with more 50 signatures asking for the prisons not to become involved with government detention contracts.

CoreCivic answered the letter and continued to engage in a meaningful way, this spring presented its first ESG report. They are working on other ways to be transparent on human rights issues.

In the late summer of 2018, GEO, however, put a ‘pause’ on dialogue. This was new to me. I’ve had companies stall or not answer letters, but to actually write and say they didn’t want to talk was new ground.

Our group was frustrated and decided to file a resolution in the fall of 2018 asking for a report (that was indicated in GEO’s own policy) concerning how implementation of the human rights policy. Many shareholders joined the group of Jesuits and Mercy Investment Services addressing this issue, and in November the resolution was filed.

As expected, the resolution was challenged, but the SEC denied the no action thus, agreeing it had to be on the ballot. Shareholders filed a proxy memo indicating reasons why it should be left on, alerted proxy advisors of the resolution, and the week before the AGM learned that both proxy advisory firms were supporting the resolution. As that information became public, we also received an unexpected email from GEO, telling us they would no longer oppose the resolution and filed such a statement with the SEC. The company never quite supported the resolution, nor changed the proxy on their site, nor put the SEC statement on their site, nor did they reach out to talk with us. So, we prepared to present at the AGM (a virtual-only AGM, but that too is for another day), and garnered nearly 88% of the vote.

(Photo by Pat Zerega, Door County Wisconsin 2016)

The story of course does not end there. Shareholders have met since then to discuss next steps and have sent a letter requesting to return to the dialogue table with all interested parties and explain what we are looking for in the requested human rights report. Thus far, there is no answer to that request, but we know there is always another twist in the road ahead.

Homework with the Trafficking in Persons Report

The Trafficking in Persons Report, or TIP Report, is an annual report issued by the U.S. State Department’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons. The TIP Report ranks governments based on their perceived efforts to acknowledge and combat human trafficking. Thursday, June 20th, the 2019 edition was issued.

The report categorizes countries of the world with regard to their adherence to the standards of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) of 2000. Each country is tiered according to compliance:

  • Tier 1 (those governments who fully comply with the TVPA’s minimum standards)
  • Tier 2 (while not fully complying, governments with significant efforts to bring themselves into compliance with those standards)
  • Tier 2 watch list (not fully complying along with a significant absolute number of trafficking victims, or a failure to increase efforts, or a determination that the country is in fact committed to making significant progress in the coming year)
  • Tier 3 (those governments who do not fully comply with the minimum standards and are not making significant efforts to do so)
  • Special cases (countries where a civil or humanitarian crisis makes gaining information difficult).

Remember that tier 1, which includes the United States, is simply compliance with the minimum standards. A tier 3 designation means that the U.S. can restrict assistance or withdraw support for the country at global funding organizations like the International Monetary Fund. Some regard the tier 2 watch list with suspicion as some determinations have suggested a reward to governments allied with the U.S. who otherwise would be in tier 3.

The report intends to offer “homework” to governments based on their tier. The image below lists the countries of the tier 2 watch list, tier 3, and special case categories. The report includes a country by country analysis of human trafficking.

I don’t want companies to avoid sourcing from these countries: I prefer companies to promote improved standards and conditions in those countries. Even if the governmental authorities do not adhere to a recognized global minimum, companies have a responsibility to act responsibly, to act in accord with the protection of human rights. A company, working in those countries, must take extra steps to reduce human trafficking and to care for the victims of trafficking in their supply chains.

The resolutions that SGI members introduced at Kraft Heinz, Macy’s, TJX, and Wendy’s aimed to do just that. We asked those companies to do a human rights impact assessment, to look through their supply chains at the most vulnerable workers. They then would mitigate the human rights abuses  and remedy those workers whose rights were violated. Over time, those learnings are compiled and integrated into the ongoing processes of the company to insure greater adherence to human rights in their supply chain.

Now for some personal homework. I would recommend printing off the image above. Perhaps, you may want to laminate it to carry it with you.

When going to bed this evening, take a look at the countries of origin for the clothing you have worn. I’d be willing to bet that much of your clothing comes from a country listed above. Many of the electronic items that we use daily have supply chains woven through these countries. I bring that to your attention, kind reader, not to shame you or make you feel guilty, but, in the hopes, that we might see– along with the companies who provide us those products– that we have real power to change the situation in those countries.